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March
20

  Declining interest rates bolster February home sales and price pre-COVID-19 outbreak, C.A.R. reports

- Existing, single-family home sales totaled 421,670 in February on a seasonally adjusted annualized rate, up 6.6 percent from January and up 5.9 percent from February 2019.

- February's statewide median home price was $579,770, down 0.8 percent from January and up 8.5 percent from February 2019.

- The statewide Unsold Inventory Index was 3.6 months in February, up from 3.4 months in January but down from 4.6 months in February 2019.


LOS ANGELES (March 20) – Before the coronavirus outbreak hit the state so severely, California's housing market was getting a strong foothold, with home sales and prices posting healthy increases in February, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (C.A.R.) said today. 

Closed escrow sales of existing, single-family detached homes in California totaled a seasonally adjusted annualized rate of 421,670 units in February, according to information collected by C.A.R. from more than 90 local REALTOR® associations and MLSs statewide. The statewide annualized sales figure represents what would be the total number of homes sold during 2020 if sales maintained the February pace throughout the year. It is adjusted to account for seasonal factors that typically influence home sales.

February's sales total was up 6.6 percent from the 395,700 level in January, marking the first time in three months that sales jumped above the 400,000 benchmark. February also marked the eighth consecutive month of year-over-year sales increases. The robust sales gain observed in the last few months may not be sustained as the recent financial market turmoil triggered by the coronavirus outbreak will likely have a negative impact on home sales in the coming months.

"As the coronavirus pandemic worsens, the housing market is expected to decline precipitously in the coming months, particularly in counties and cities with a "shelter in place" mandate, where open houses and home showings cannot be held," said 2020 C.A.R. President Jeanne Radsick, a second-generation REALTOR® from Bakersfield, Calif. "Additionally, sales in escrow may be delayed by the closure or limited availability of all the essential services related to a home sale, such as financing, title, escrow, recording or by buyers who may have backed out of a purchase due to coronavirus concerns."

A C.A.R. flash poll conducted between March 14-16 found that more than half (54 percent) of REALTORS® had clients who backed out from buying a home because of the coronavirus, and less than one-half (45 percent) had clients who backed out from selling a property.

The median price inched up 0.8 percent from January's revised $575,160 to $579,770 in February. The median price climbed 8.5 percent from $534,120 in February 2019. February marked the third straight month with a year-over-year gain of more than 7 percent, fueled by low interest rates.

"The economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic are becoming more pronounced as uncertainty continues in the financial markets, consumer spending declines and unemployment insurance claims rise—all factors that impact the housing market," said C.A.R. Senior Vice President and Chief Economist Leslie Appleton-Young. "The housing market condition is expected to deteriorate accordingly in the near term, with both sales and prices being downgraded from our original 2020 housing forecast in the coming months."

Other key points from C.A.R.'s February 2020 resale housing report include:

  • At the regional level, non-seasonally adjusted sales rose from last year in all major regions, except the Bay Area. Southern California increased the most with 12.5 percent, followed by Central Coast (7.6 percent) and Central Valley (2.3 percent).  Thirty-two of the 51 counties tracked by C.A.R. experienced year-over-year growth, with Siskiyou gaining the most from last year at 100.0 percent. Tehama had the biggest drop, with sales falling 40.5 percent on a year-over-year basis.
  • Median prices in all regions increased in February from last year, with Central Coast up the most at 10.0 percent, followed by Southern California (8.4 percent), Central Valley (6.3 percent), and the Bay Area (5.0 percent).
  • Forty-one of the 51 counties tracked by C.A.R. reported a year-over-year gain in price in February, with Plumas gaining the most at 24.4 percent from last year.  Of the 10 counties that experienced a price drop from last February, Mariposa had the biggest decline of 11.2 percent.
  • California housing supply continued to increase in February from the prior month as the market geared up for the spring home-buying season, with the number of active listings inched up by 0.9 percent from January.  The month-to-month increase is on par with the average January to February increase of 0.8 percent recorded between 2008 and 2019. On a year-over-year basis, however, active listings continued to drop by more than 25 percent for the third consecutive month.  Since September of last year, the number of active listings decreased an average of 21.8 percent from the prior year.  
  • The sizable drop in active listings, together with the increase in sales, continued to put downward pressure on the Unsold Inventory Index (UII), resulting in a drop in the index to 3.6 months, down from 4.6 months a year ago. 
  • With new coronavirus cases continuing to spread across the nation and a declaration of a national emergency, many potential sellers will likely delay putting their homes on the market, which may lead to fewer new listings. On the other hand, if homebuyers postpone their plans to enter the market due to their dimmer financial outlook, a sharp sales decline will result in an increase in unsold inventory in the short term.
  • The median number of days it took to sell a California single-family home fell significantly from a year ago, declining from 33 days in February 2019 to 23 days in February 2020.
  • C.A.R.'s statewide sales-price-to-list-price ratio* was 99.1 percent in February 2020, up from 98.0 in February 2019.
  • The statewide average price per square foot** for an existing single-family home was $283 in February 2020 and $271 in February 2019.
  • The 30-year, fixed-mortgage interest rate averaged 3.47 percent in February, down from 4.37 percent in February 2019, according to Freddie Mac. The five-year, adjustable mortgage interest rate was an average of 3.26 percent, compared to 3.87 percent in February 2019.

Note:  The County MLS median price and sales data in the tables are generated from a survey of more than 90 associations of REALTORS® throughout the state and represent statistics of existing single-family detached homes only. County sales data are not adjusted to account for seasonal factors that can influence home sales. Movements in sales prices should not be interpreted as changes in the cost of a standard home. The median price is where half sold for more and half sold for less; medians are more typical than average prices, which are skewed by a relatively small share of transactions at either the lower end or the upper end. Median prices can be influenced by changes in cost, as well as changes in the characteristics and the size of homes sold. The change in median prices should not be construed as actual price changes in specific homes.

*Sales-to-list-price ratio is an indicator that reflects the negotiation power of home buyers and home sellers under current market conditions. The ratio is calculated by dividing the final sales price of a property by its last list price and is expressed as a percentage. A sales-to-list ratio with 100 percent or above suggests that the property sold for more than the list price, and a ratio below 100 percent indicates that the price sold below the asking price.

**Price per square foot is a measure commonly used by real estate agents and brokers to determine how much a square foot of space a buyer will pay for a property. It is calculated as the sale price of the home divided by the number of finished square feet. C.A.R. currently tracks price-per-square foot statistics for 50 counties.

Leading the way…® in California real estate for more than 110 years, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (www.car.org) is one of the largest state trade organizations in the United States with more than 200,000 members dedicated to the advancement of professionalism in real estate. C.A.R. is headquartered in Los Angeles.

# # #

February 2020 County Sales and Price Activity
(Regional and condo sales data not seasonally adjusted)

February 2020

Median Sold Price of Existing Single-Family Homes

Sales

State/Region/County

Feb. 2020

Jan. 2020

 

Feb. 2019

 

Price MTM% Chg

Price YTY% Chg

Sales MTM% Chg

Sales YTY% Chg

Calif. Single-family homes

$579,770

$575,160

 

$534,120

r

0.8%

8.5%

6.6%

5.9%

Calif. Condo/Townhomes

$480,000

$467,000

 

$450,000

 

2.8%

6.7%

13.7%

14.3%

Los Angeles Metro Area

$550,000

$538,500

 

$505,000

 

2.1%

8.9%

-0.9%

13.7%

Central Coast

$715,000

$700,000

 

$650,000

 

2.1%

10.0%

0.0%

7.6%

Central Valley

$340,000

$337,500

 

$320,000

 

0.7%

6.3%

0.8%

2.3%

Inland Empire

$395,000

$385,000

 

$369,900

 

2.6%

6.8%

1.2%

10.7%

San Francisco Bay Area

$910,000

$853,000

 

$867,000

 

6.7%

5.0%

8.9%

-1.3%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Francisco Bay Area

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alameda

$945,000

$875,000

 

$860,000

 

8.0%

9.9%

1.4%

-15.9%

Contra Costa

$635,250

$614,000

 

$649,480

 

3.5%

-2.2%

4.2%

8.8%

Marin

$1,347,500

$1,294,000

 

$1,290,000

 

4.1%

4.5%

6.2%

-18.1%

Napa

$659,500

$697,500

 

$625,000

 

-5.4%

5.5%

-32.3%

-37.3%

San Francisco

$1,610,000

$1,460,000

 

$1,505,000

 

10.3%

7.0%

19.4%

0.9%

San Mateo

$1,575,000

$1,422,250

 

$1,425,000

 

10.7%

10.5%

23.0%

2.8%

Santa Clara

$1,350,000

$1,200,000

 

$1,170,000

 

12.5%

15.4%

16.7%

-1.6%

Solano

$470,000

$449,900

 

$425,000

 

4.5%

10.6%

9.6%

9.2%

Sonoma

$640,000

$667,000

 

$625,420

 

-4.0%

2.3%

15.3%

12.7%

Southern California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Los Angeles

$580,690

$617,520

 

$541,390

 

-6.0%

7.3%

-8.6%

9.3%

Orange

$880,000

$855,000

 

$792,500

 

2.9%

11.0%

11.5%

34.7%

Riverside

$428,000

$415,460

 

$410,000

 

3.0%

4.4%

4.2%

11.3%

San Bernardino

$329,000

$325,000

 

$298,250

 

1.2%

10.3%

-3.8%

9.6%

San Diego

$670,000

$660,000

 

$625,000

 

1.5%

7.2%

3.4%

7.2%

Ventura

$649,500

$660,000

 

$620,000

 

-1.6%

4.8%

3.9%

6.8%

Central Coast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monterey

$700,000

$649,500

 

$593,950

 

7.8%

17.9%

2.1%

-0.7%

San Luis Obispo

$640,000

$652,500

 

$592,500

 

-1.9%

8.0%

26.9%

22.2%

Santa Barbara

$772,750

$675,000

 

$645,000

 

14.5%

19.8%

-17.8%

1.9%

Santa Cruz

$897,500

$869,500

 

$927,000

 

3.2%

-3.2%

-10.0%

4.7%

Central Valley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fresno

$289,950

$289,950

 

$265,000

 

0.0%

9.4%

-3.5%

14.5%

Glenn

$288,250

$315,000

 

$281,000

 

-8.5%

2.6%

-40.0%

-29.4%

Kern

$259,000

$252,000

 

$240,000

 

2.8%

7.9%

0.3%

10.0%

Kings

$255,000

$247,450

 

$221,000

 

3.1%

15.4%

-9.0%

0.0%

Madera

$285,000

$334,790

 

$259,000

 

-14.9%

10.0%

28.4%

0.0%

Merced

$285,950

$282,950

 

$269,000

 

1.1%

6.3%

5.5%

26.4%

Placer

$509,000

$493,000

 

$495,000

 

3.2%

2.8%

-5.6%

-15.7%

Sacramento

$398,500

$379,000

 

$360,000

 

5.1%

10.7%

6.4%

0.2%

San Benito

$595,000

$575,020

 

$600,000

 

3.5%

-0.8%

-21.9%

-19.4%

San Joaquin

$390,000

$385,000

 

$370,000

 

1.3%

5.4%

-7.5%

5.2%

Stanislaus

$339,000

$330,000

 

$310,000

 

2.7%

9.4%

8.4%

0.0%

Tulare

$252,000

$240,000

 

$243,500

 

5.0%

3.5%

-1.8%

2.3%

Other Calif. Counties

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amador

$328,000

$335,000

 

$316,000

r

-2.1%

3.8%

0.0%

36.7%

Butte

$338,750

$355,860

 

$345,450

 

-4.8%

-1.9%

-10.6%

-40.4%

Calaveras

$355,000

$343,500

 

$340,000

 

3.3%

4.4%

40.4%

-18.9%

Del Norte

$297,000

$227,000

 

$245,000

 

30.8%

21.2%

-33.3%

9.1%

El Dorado

$465,000

$442,120

 

$495,000

 

5.2%

-6.1%

16.3%

74.0%

Humboldt

$310,390

$308,000

 

$298,000

 

0.8%

4.2%

-3.3%

12.8%

Lake

$235,000

$253,000

 

$260,000

 

-7.1%

-9.6%

46.7%

11.9%

Lassen

$199,000

$239,000

 

$185,000

 

-16.7%

7.6%

-35.3%

-38.9%

Mariposa

$327,500

$266,000

 

$369,000

 

23.1%

-11.2%

38.5%

38.5%

Mendocino

$467,000

$412,000

 

$377,000

 

13.3%

23.9%

-14.7%

0.0%

Mono

$700,000

$780,000

 

$765,000

 

-10.3%

-8.5%

36.4%

36.4%

Nevada

$420,000

$367,000

 

$382,000

 

14.4%

9.9%

1.3%

1.3%

Plumas

$321,500

$330,000

 

$258,500

 

-2.6%

24.4%

46.7%

-8.3%

Shasta

$291,500

$282,500

 

$285,000

 

3.2%

2.3%

-18.6%

-8.6%

Siskiyou

$219,000

$255,000

 

$224,500

 

-14.1%

-2.4%

-10.0%

100.0%

Sutter

$318,500

$327,250

 

$292,500

 

-2.7%

8.9%

-6.7%

-3.4%

Tehama

$265,000

$260,000

 

$224,500

 

1.9%

18.0%

0.0%

-40.5%

Tuolumne

$297,500

$309,000

 

$299,000

 

-3.7%

-0.5%

13.8%

78.4%

Yolo

$447,500

$431,240

 

$424,920

 

3.8%

5.3%

4.5%

5.7%

Yuba

$315,000

$315,000

 

$256,000

 

0.0%

23.0%

11.9%

24.5%

 

r = revised

NA = not available

 

February 2020 County Unsold Inventory and Days on Market
(Regional and condo sales data not seasonally adjusted)

 

February 2020

Unsold Inventory Index

Median Time on Market

State/Region/County

Feb. 2020

Jan. 2020

 

Feb. 2019

 

Feb. 2020

Jan. 2020

 

Feb. 2019

 

Calif. Single-family homes

3.6

3.4

 

4.6

 

23.0

31.0

 

33.0

 

Calif. Condo/Townhomes

3.0

3.3

 

4.1

 

21.0

31.0

 

28.0

 

Los Angeles Metro Area

3.8

3.6

 

5.5

 

29.0

32.0

 

42.0

 

Central Coast

4.8

4.4

 

5.5

 

31.0

44.0

 

49.0

 

Central Valley

3.1

3.0

 

3.8

 

18.5

24.0

 

29.0

 

Inland Empire

4.1

4.1

 

5.5

 

41.0

41.0

 

48.0

 

San Francisco Bay Area

3.0

2.7

 

3.3

 

14.0

31.0

 

20.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Francisco Bay Area

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alameda

2.5

2.0

 

2.7

 

12.0

20.0

 

15.0

 

Contra Costa

2.7

2.3

 

3.5

 

12.0

27.0

 

15.0

 

Marin

4.3

3.3

 

3.7

 

42.5

63.0

 

49.0

 

Napa

9.6

5.0

 

5.8

 

39.0

62.0

 

49.0

 

San Francisco

3.0

2.7

 

2.8

 

15.0

26.0

 

15.0

 

San Mateo

2.6

2.7

 

2.9

 

11.0

21.0

 

13.0

 

Santa Clara

2.7

2.3

 

3.1

 

8.0

19.0

 

12.0

 

Solano

3.0

3.0

 

3.8

 

39.0

39.0

 

43.5

 

Sonoma

4.4

4.4

 

4.2

 

51.5

68.0

 

65.0

 

Southern California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Los Angeles

3.6

3.2

 

5.1

 

22.0

26.0

 

35.0

 

Orange

3.4

3.4

 

5.9

 

17.0

27.0

 

42.0

 

Riverside

4.1

4.2

 

5.6

 

39.0

39.0

 

45.0

 

San Bernardino

4.1

3.9

 

5.4

 

45.0

43.0

 

56.0

 

San Diego

3.0

3.0

 

4.3

 

12.0

23.0

 

22.0

 

Ventura

5.1

4.8

 

6.7

 

49.0

56.0

 

59.0

 

Central Coast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monterey

5.1

4.9

 

5.6

 

28.0

39.0

 

51.0

 

San Luis Obispo

4.8

5.9

 

6.0

 

37.5

46.0

 

42.0

 

Santa Barbara

4.8

3.7

 

5.5

 

28.5

35.0

 

49.0

 

Santa Cruz

4.1

2.8

 

4.1

 

26.5

55.5

 

55.5

 

Central Valley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fresno

3.5

3.4

 

4.9

 

26.0

25.5

 

24.0

 

Glenn

5.3

3.0

 

4.5

 

75.5

63.0

 

11.0

 

Kern

3.2

3.0

 

4.0

 

22.0

21.0

 

31.0

 

Kings

3.2

3.1

 

4.1

 

17.0

25.0

 

29.0

 

Madera

4.9

5.8

 

4.9

 

40.0

45.0

 

51.5

 

Merced

3.3

3.6

 

5.3

 

32.0

28.0

 

44.0

 

Placer

3.4

2.8

 

3.2

 

16.0

34.0

 

28.5

 

Sacramento

2.3

2.4

 

2.8

 

10.0

17.0

 

27.0

 

San Benito

6.5

4.0

 

5.3

 

55.0

29.5

 

24.0

 

San Joaquin

3.2

2.8

 

3.9

 

26.5

32.0

 

31.0

 

Stanislaus

2.6

2.8

 

3.4

 

17.0

24.0

 

33.0

 

Tulare

4.1

3.8

 

5.0

 

21.0

27.0

 

34.5

 

Other Calif. Counties

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amador

7.8

6.6

 

NA

 

49.0

40.0

 

58.0

r

Butte

3.0

2.7

 

2.0

 

24.5

25.5

 

8.0

 

Calaveras

5.7

7.4

 

4.3

 

108.0

107.5

 

51.0

 

Del Norte

11.8

7.3

 

11.5

 

168.0

121.0

 

111.0

 

El Dorado

4.5

4.7

 

5.5

 

44.0

65.5

 

42.0

 

Humboldt

4.5

4.4

 

6.6

 

38.5

40.0

 

34.0

 

Lake

6.1

8.4

 

6.6

 

61.5

77.0

 

76.0

 

Lassen

10.7

6.6

 

6.2

 

133.0

133.0

 

114.0

 

Mariposa

5.4

7.3

 

6.8

 

107.0

88.0

 

36.0

 

Mendocino

10.3

9.0

 

12.6

 

102.0

109.0

 

83.0

 

Mono

5.8

8.7

 

6.5

 

119.0

126.0

 

198.0

 

Nevada

6.4

5.7

 

5.4

 

42.0

62.5

 

50.5

 

Plumas

9.6

13.5

 

9.2

 

191.0

106.0

 

143.0

 

Shasta

4.8

3.8

 

4.7

 

50.0

43.0

 

34.0

 

Siskiyou

6.5

5.5

 

13.7

 

89.0

48.5

 

76.0

 

Sutter

2.6

2.5

 

2.3

 

26.5

31.0

 

39.5

 

Tehama

9.0

8.0

 

4.0

 

81.0

52.0

 

56.0

 

Tuolumne

5.6

6.2

 

7.9

 

85.0

71.5

 

97.0

 

Yolo

3.4

3.2

 

3.6

 

17.5

40.5

 

22.0

 

Yuba

3.5

3.6

 

3.7

 

23.0

30.0

 

39.0

 

 

r = revised

NA = not available

 

 

 

 

 

 

March
20

 VISIT WWW.AVOCADOMONTHLY.COM

YOU ARE ABLE TO ORDER TABLE TO FARM CALIFORNIA ORGANIC AVOCADOS

March
20

  More California REALTORS® expect COVID-19 to impact housing market,
C.A.R. flash survey finds

LOS ANGELES (March 19) – As the coronavirus pandemic continues to worsen, a growing number of California REALTORS® this week expect the pandemic to negatively impact their business, primarily with open house traffic, where 85 percent expect a negative impact in that area of their business, according to a flash poll conducted by the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (C.A.R.)

(Note: the survey was conducted March 14-16, prior to the "shelter in place" and the closing of non-essential businesses announcement in six Bay Area counties and Sonoma County and before Los Angeles' mayor issued temporary restrictions to slow the spread of the coronavirus.)

Highlights of the poll:

  • More than three-fourths (78 percent) of California REALTORS® expect there will be a negative impact on home sales, up from 53 percent last week.
  • Nearly three in four (74 percent) said they expect time on market will be negatively impacted, up from 51 percent last week.
  • Seventy-four percent of California REALTORS® said home sales will be negatively affected, up from 53 percent last week.
  • Other areas that REALTORS® said would be negatively impacted were housing inventory (62 percent), price (58 percent), closing (52 percent), time in escrow (45 percent) and market competition (41 percent).
  • Seventy-five percent said they have not been doing more virtual tours. (This question was not asked in Week 1.)
  • More than a half of REALTORS® (54 percent) had clients who backed out from a home purchase because of the coronavirus and less than one-half (45 percent) had clients who backed out from a home sale. (This question was not asked in Week 1.)
  • The vast majority of REALTORS® have not had sellers who wanted to take their home off the market due to coronavirus concerns. (This question was not asked in Week 1.)
  • Two-thirds of REALTORS® had clients asking them coronavirus market-related questions, up from 40 percent last week.

The survey was conducted March 14-16 via email, asking members how the coronavirus outbreak was affecting their business. Nearly 1,100 responses were received.

Leading the way…® in California real estate for more than 110 years, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®(www.car.org) is one of the largest state trade organizations in the United States with more than 200,000 members dedicated to the advancement of professionalism in real estate. C.A.R. is headquartered in Los Angeles.

February
18

Butternut Squash Avocado Muffins

TOTAL TIME:

60 min

PREP TIME:

35 min

COOK TIME:

25 min

NUTRITIONAL HIGHLIGHTS(Per serving)See Full
170CALORIES
7 gFAT
4 gFIBER
290 mgSODIUM
24 gCARBS
Butternut Squash Avocado Muffins

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These savory muffins combine the natural sweetness of butternut squash, the rich texture of a California avocado and the subtle flavor of coconut. Enjoy this muffin for breakfast alongside a dollop of cottage cheese or serve with steamy bowl of soup. A recipe variation adds chocolate chips to create delicious dessert muffins. These muffins are an excellent source of vitamin A (25% DV)and vitamin E (20% DV).

INGREDIENTS

Serves: 12

12 paper muffin cups, optional
As needed cooking spray
1 lb. fresh butternut squash, peeled and cubed, (or 1 cup canned pureed butternut squash)
1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
3/4 cup almond flour
1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/4 cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
1/2 ripe, Fresh California Avocado, seeded, peeled and mashed (about ¼ cup)
1/4 cup plain Greek yogurt
1 tsp. pure vanilla extract
1/3 cup almond milk
1/3 cup sliced almonds
1/2 cup chocolate chips, optional

As with all fruits and vegetables, wash avocados before cutting.
Check out our tips for how to choose and use California Avocados.

 

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Prepare muffin tin with paper muffin cups - spray each cup with cooking spray. Set aside.
  3. Cut butternut squash into cubes (around 1-inch square each) and bake on a cookie sheet at 350 degrees F for around 30 minutes or until fork tender. Cool, puree squash in food processor or use 1 cup of canned pureed butternut squash and set aside.
  4. Spoon flours into dry measuring cups and level with a knife.
  5. Whisk together baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon in a medium sized bowl. Set aside.
  6. Combine sugar, eggs, avocado, yogurt and vanilla in a large bowl and beat with a hand mixer until well combined.
  7. Add almond milk and pureed butternut squash, beating at a low speed until blended together.
  8. Add flour mixture to above mixture and beat at a low speed just until combined (don't over mix).
  9. Spoon batter into muffin cups and fill half-way. Sprinkle a few almonds evenly over each muffin. Top with chocolate chips (optional).
  10. Bake muffins for 25-30 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean.

*Large avocados are recommended for this recipe. A large avocado averages about 8 ounces. If using smaller or larger size avocados adjust the quantity accordingly.

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Calories 170
Total Fat 7 g (Sat 1 g, Trans 0 g, Poly 0.5 g, Mono 1.5 g)
Cholesterol 30 mg
Sodium 290 mg
Potassium 260 mg
Total Carbohydrates 24 g
Dietary Fiber 4 g
Total Sugar 6 g
Protein 6 g

 

Vitamin A 218 mcg; Vitamin C 8 mg; Calcium 105 mg; Iron 1 mg; Vitamin D 0 mcg; Folate 21 mcg; Omega 3 Fatty Acid 0.03 g  

% Daily Value*: Vitamin A 25%; Vitamin C 8%; Calcium 8%; Iron 6%; Vitamin D 0%

 

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 Calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

February
18

Homebuilder confidence slightly fell again this month, according to February's Housing Market Index. The last three monthly readings mark the highest sentiment levels since December 2017.

 

The National Association of Home Builders and Wells Fargo, which publish the monthly report, revealed sentiment slipped by one point to 74.

While this is the second consecutive month for the sentiment to fall, December of 2019 saw a sentiment increase of five points to 75, marking the highest reading since June of 1999.

"At a time when demand is on the rise, regulatory constraints along with a shortage of construction workers and a dearth of lots are hindering the production of affordable housing in local communities across the nation," said NAHB Chief Economist Robert Dietz. "And while lower mortgage rates have improved housing affordability in recent months, accelerating price growth due to limited inventory may offset some of that effect."

This month, the index measuring current sales conditions fell to 80 points, while buyer traffic decreased slightly, to 57 and sales expectations over the next six months remained at 79 points.

The three-month moving averages for regional HMI scores show that while the South rose two points to 78, the Northeast rose to 63 points, the Midwest increased to 67 points and the West fell one point to 83.

"Steady job growth, rising wages and low interest rates are fueling demand but builders are still grappling with increasing construction and development costs," said NAHB Chairman Dean Mon, a home builder and developer from Shrewsbury, New Jersey.

NOTE: The NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index gauges builder opinions of single-family home sales and expectations, asking for a rating of good, fair or poor. Builders are also asked to rate prospective buyer traffic from very low to very high. The scores are used to calculate a seasonally adjusted index with a rating of 50 or over indicating positive sentiment

 

 

 

February
18

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Affordable Home Projects to Speed Up a Sale

 

Having a house on the market can be stressful. The longer it stays up for sale, the more anxiety you're likely to feel. There are a few things you can do that will boost your home's aesthetic and make them more appealing to potential buyers. However, it's important to keep an eye on your budget; you don't want to spend more on upgrades than you'll get back in home value. Here are a few ways you can update your home to draw in buyers without breaking the bank:

 

Savvy Staging

 

One of the simplest ways to catch buyers' eyes is to make sure your home is properly staged. If you have a unique décor style, you limit the number of people who are going to be drawn to your home. The more neutral and universal the décor in your home, the better.

 

An easy way to suit most people's tastes is to select décor pieces from major shops like Target. These stores appeal to the most popular decoration styles, and their items tend to look good together. You're also more likely to be able to find sales, coupons, and cashback rewards at these kinds of retailers. This means you can one-stop-shop and save money along the way. Also, according to Rakuten's 17 tips for saving at Target, you can also save money by browsing the Weekly Ad, browsing the clearance section, and applying for a REDcard.

 

Lifestyle Improvements

 

Anything you can add to your home that will visually signal lifestyle upgrades to your buyers will go a long way. For example, you can consider installing a wood fence; these look great, provide privacy, and are a big draw for buyers who have (or want) children or dogs.

 

However, you need to make sure you have the budget for the project – lumber averages from $7 to $15 per foot (the type of material will ultimately determine how much you'll pay for your fence), and labor can run between $10 and $15 per foot of fence. As tempting as it may be to cut corners, it's important to hire contractors who can get the job done right; otherwise, the fence might wind up flagged on inspection and cost you a sale. Whether it's a fence, a finished basement, a nice porch, or any other lifestyle booster, carefully considering the cost and balancing it against the return in sale price is an absolute must.

 

Aesthetic Upgrades

 

Certain details in your home can make the space look older, dated, and completely out of style. For example, cabinetry hardware has gone through many trend changes, so it can easily date your home and turn off prospective buyers. Doorknobs, curtain rods (can be purchased for under $10), and other easily replaced hardware throughout your home can do the same. Fortunately, you can generally upgrade these things on your own and on a relatively small budget.

 

Other items, such as old wallpaper or dated paneling, may or may not be worth the time and energy required to upgrade them. Remember: There are always buyers on the market looking for a project. Paint jobs and wallpaper can put a small dent in the value of your home, but it may be worth it if you can snag buyers looking to turn a space into their dream home. Thoughtfully consider which jobs you might be able to save time and money on without decreasing your home's value too dramatically in process.

 

Curb Appeal

 

Finally, focus on little things you can do to make your house catch viewers the instant they look at it. Whether it's online listings or in-person viewings, your home's façade is the first impression you make on viewers. It's important to make sure you nail it.

 

Something as simple as an inexpensive (or even DIYed, if your crafty) wreath can give your property a homey feel. With the addition of a few potted plants, your front doorway will set the tone for buyers, making your home as appealing as possible. When they come in through a door that feels inviting, they're much more likely to want to stay.

 

Securing buyers as quickly as possible will make your selling experience less stressful and more profitable. After all, the longer your house is on the market, the less likely you are to hit the sales price you're hoping for. So, by taking steps to make your house as appealing as possible, you'll find the ideal buyers in a short amount of time!

 

Photo Credit: Pexels

February
4

California Real Estate

There are currently 84,031 homes for sale in California. The median list price in California is $619,900 and the average price per square foot is $325.

February
4

As with all fruits and vegetables, wash avocados before cutting.
Check out our tips for how to choose and use California Avocados.


After receiving a number of messages (and photos - ouch!) recently from folks who are having trouble with cutting an avocado, I thought I'd take some time to run through the process of safely cutting an avocado.

5 TIPS TO HELP YOU CUT AN AVOCADO WITHOUT CUTTING YOURSELF

Here are some easy ways to safely cut an avocado. The below assumes your avocados have been washed and toweled dry prior to beginning.

    1. Use a knife suitable for cutting an avocado. Make sure your knife is maneuverable yet large enough to easily control. I like using a medium-sized chef's knife, or an asian (Santoku) style knife with scalloped edges. Avoid paring knives for cutting avocados. A shorter knife like a paring knife may not always reach all the way to the seed when cutting - especially if you have larger avocados. Not to mention, paring knives can often be very sharp. When cutting ripe avocados you do not necessarily need the sharpest knife, as the flesh is smooth and creamy. You just need to get through the skin. If you do not have access to a chef's knife or Santoku knife, a steak knife will generally do.

    1. Keep the avocado on the cutting board while cutting and de-seeding your avocados. There is no reason to pick up the avocado after you have washed it and toweled it dry - other than to move it to the cutting board. Instead of picking up the avocado and going around the seed in your hand with a knife to cut it, leave the avocado on the cutting board. Cut into the avocado and then hold the knife horizontally while rotating the avocado until the two halves are able to be separated.

      avocado-cutting.jpg

      You can proceed to a) quarter the avocado by rotating it 90 degrees and doing another 360 degree horizontal cut around the seed; or b) separate the two halves and place them on the cutting board face up

      halved-avocado-cutting.jpg

    1. Do not 'wack' the seed with a knife or poke at the seed with the tip of a knife while holding an avocado in your hand. The flesh of the avocado is very easy to cut through, which makes this common method of de-seeding avocados especially dangerous. See #4 for a tip on easily removing the seed

    1. Remove the seed by using a spoon, then slice the avocado halves into quarters by putting them face down on the cutting board and slicing through the skin from the stem downwards. Or use the quartering method described in section #2a above

      quartering-avocado-cutting.jpg

      When quartering an avocado, remove the seed with your fingers and place it in the waste bin (or grow your own avocado tree)

  1. Peel your avocados. Scooping the avocado flesh away from the skin may be slightly faster, but the benefits of peeling avocados outweighs the convenience of scooping the flesh of the fruit away from the skin quickly. Read how to peel avocados and learn about how to get all of the nutrients from your avocados by peeling

BONUS AVOCADO CUTTING TIP

Dice or slice your avocado once you have your halves or quarters. It's common practice for some folks to cut their avocados in half and then slice into the flesh while the fruit is still in the shell (either trying to get slices or dices out by following up with a spoon and scooping the sliced or diced flesh away from the skin). This is dangerous when done in your hand as the tip of a knife can easily cut through both the flesh and the skin and go straight into your hand. Instead, get your halves or quarters on the cutting board, face down, and slice or dice as needed.

slicing-avocados.jpg

dicing-avocados.jpg

OTHER HELPFUL AVOCADO CUTTING RESOURCES

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